The network of performance art festivals as an independent art institution – a historical survey

Performance art emerged out of the rebellion against art institutions understood in
a colloquial meaning of the word – i.e. museums, collectors and commercial galleries.
Performance artists of the 70s tried to work “outside of the system” – hence the
extreme cases such as performances for no or very limited audience by Chris Burden
(Transfixed, 1974), Vito Acconci (Photo Piece/BLINK, 1969), or private action by
Linda Montano and Tehching Hsieh (One Year Performance, 1983–84). In America,
it was a time when official art places were contested (I avoid the word: ‛institution’
deliberately) – the protests organized by the Art Workers’ Coalition and women
organizations against the closed circuit of white, male, heterosexual art of selected
artists. The fact that performance art does not need sophisticated infrastructure
fosters its existence in an alternative circuit. That circuit is predominantly also
independent financially because festivals, meetings and shows have happened in
many places of the world almost without any budget. From the very beginning artists
have founded independent institutions (such as Franklin Furnace gallery set up in
New York in 1976 – today it exists as an archive deposited in the Pratt Institute)
or art magazines (such as the Avalanche in New York). In USA performance artists
organized themselves around some concrete art spaces. […]

The whole text was published in the Annales Universitatis Paedagogicae Cracoviensis. Studia de Arte et Educatione vol. 12 (2017) and is available at: https://www.academia.edu/36886728/The_network_of_performance_art_festivals_as_an_independent_art_institution_a_historical_survey

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